Tag Archive | wind

Playing Catch Up

December 24, 2015

Happy Holidays to everyone!  I’m woefully behind on bee updates, and now that all the holiday hustle and bustle is slowing down, it’s a good time for a quick recap of the past few months…

Picking up Where We Left Off…

Not sure if you recall the Price of Slacking post from mid-September.  Laying patterns were sporadic or brood was dwindling in three hives.  For the record, this is not uncommon when the seasons change and the bees begin to transition their focus from multiplying their numbers to storing food for the winter.  Regardless, I made the mistake of getting involved by ordering 3 mite resistant queens from PA ($150 w/ shipping, yikes!).  High price due to 1) scarcity of queens that time of year, and 2) they were good quality, mite resistant queens from a very reputable breeder.  And they came from PA, so I knew they could withstand our winter.

 

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New Queens in the Hives

For the first time, I entered the hives with the intent of pinching queens.  Of course, when I reentered hives to replace the queens, the brood patterns had improved in all three hives. Ugh!  Too late, I had the queens in hand, so I found and pinched 2 nice looking queens in Purple and Blue hives and added the new queens.  I felt sick over it and decided I will not do that again.  However, I was patting myself on the back upon realizing that I am indeed capable of successfully identifying unmarked queens.

Green hive had dwindled in numbers, so I reduced their boxes down to two and could not find their queen.  I ended up leaving them with their existing queen…which left me with one homeless queen.  I gave her to a fellow bee club member and tried to brush this fiasco out of mind.

RIP Blue Hive

Blue Hive did not take.  They died out within a week or two.  The queen in Purple Hive did take.  We entered winter with 4 hives.  Who knows if they would still be going had I not gotten involved.  I know I’d be $150 richer!

 

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Ever Forward…into Winter

I winterized the girls in October, adding the wind barriers and mouse guards.  I made candy, which was added to the hives a week ago.  Believe it or not, we’ve had 70 degree weather in December here in MD.  Not sure if that’s good or bad, but the bees seem to enjoy it when the sun shines.  It’s been wet, so ventilation and ice are at the top of my concerns this winter.

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All four hives are still going.  Green hive is small and fragile, so I don’t have high hopes for them.  Yellow hive is not as strong as they had been over the summer.  Mint and Purple hives are currently my two strongest.  As I’ve said many times, anything can happen at any time.  Just keep them fed and well ventilated, and hope for the best.

In the meantime, we’re making good use of the honey.  The hubster has already made a braggot (honey beer), and I have 10 gallons of mead aging in the hall closet. We’ve been eating it and cooking with it.  I made cream honey for Christmas gifts, and I’ve been making lots of lotions and potions to sell for my Bead and Bubble business.  We’ll have an online store up soon.

Three Years of BooBee Honey!

All in all, we’re truly blessed with our bees and blessed to have so many friends and family who are interested in learning and reading about them.  I’ve been writing this blog for three years.  Hard to believe.  I’ve referred back to it many times myself, and I’m thrilled everytime another beekeeper tells me they love my blog and have learned from it.  That’s what it’s all about.

Thank you all for sharing our beekeeping adventure.  The journey is far from over!

Merry Christmas (and/or happy holidays) and best wishes for a thriving 2016 beekeeping year!

Paula, the Hubster, and the Bees

BooBee December Update

December 13, 2014, Saturday

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Between work and the holidays, my free time has disappeared, and so I’m playing catchup on my bee journal.

The weather changes every few days around here – 60’s and sunny one day, then below 30’s and bitter cold.  I don’t mind that because the girls get opportunities to get out and about and I can check on their statuses.  I confess that during the winter I never quite know what’s going on, and I’m never an optimist.  Anything can happen at any time.

Possible Issues with Purple Hive

Everyone is still flying about during warm spurts, but I have noticed that Purple Hive has a lot more dead bees coming out of the hive than the others, and Mint Hive doesn’t appear to have much activity at all.  When I lift the lids, I see bees in all hives but Purple Hive.  That doesn’t necessarily mean they’re dying out because they may be toward the bottom staying warm.  Candy has been consumed and they are cleaning house regularly, so there is activity.  I just have to sit back and hope for the best until the weather turns warm enough to warrant further investigation.

Winter Prep

I hadn’t shown off our winter wind breakers this year.  Last year’s wind breakers were very effective, but a bit tedious to put up and maintain.  This year we went with a simpler approach.  My husband owns a large format printing business, which means he has access to coroplast and metal frames that stick in the ground.  He used thick 1/2 inch 4 ft x 6 ft sheets of coroplast to form a barrier around the outside of the hives.  This creates an easy, inexpensive and effective wind breaker.

I don’t wrap hives, mainly because I believe that hives need to breath and that wrapping prevents that, causing ventilation issues.  If we lived in Canada or Vermont, then yes, I would probably wrap.  But with our warmer climate, although we have cold spurts and snow, I don’t think it warrants wrapping.  Wind breakers help tremendously for keeping out the cold and they’re much easier to work around.

Bees can manage in the cold – moisture is a bigger problem.

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Candy Making Party

I mentioned that they’re eating candy.  In November our bee club had our annual Candy Making Party.  I love the candy making party.  Always a fun time to get better acquainted with other beekeepers, ask questions and learn.  Click here to check out our candy recipe.   The bees seem to enjoy the candy and since the party, I’ve already replenished their supply.  Some feel that candy is for emergency feeding.  True, but I don’t think it hurts to keep it in the hives during the winter to ensure they always have food.  If they don’t need it, they won’t eat it, it’s a simple as that.  I supplemented with candy all winter last year and had two very healthy hives come through with flying colors.

One lesson I learned is NOT to cover the top of the frames with candy because this inhibits ventilation.  This year I placed the candy across the front third of the hive on the side where the morning sun first hits.   This helps soften the candy and allows plenty of room for air to circulate.

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So there you have a two month update in a nutshell.  Bees, winterization and candy…oh my!  Hope everyone’s girls are hanging in there through this cold and blustery time of year.  Expect the worst and hope for the best…that’s my motto!

I am looking forward to the quiet time to catch up on indoor activities like reading up on my strategies for the coming year, cleaning equipment, and making homemade lotions and potions.  Stay tuned for fun recipes and how to’s.

Best wishes from all of the BooBees at BooBee Honey for a bee-utiful, happy holiday season!!!  

Home Built Hive Windbreakers

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Part 1 – Exterior Winter Prep

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The hubster has done it again.  I’ve been agonizing over our plan for winter prep.  Exterior windbreakers are half of the plan.  Hay bales are popular, wrapping hives with roofing paper or cardboard, etc.  Lots of ideas out there, but the consensus on wrapping, at least in our area, is that although it keeps the heat in and protects from the wind,wrapping also keeps the moisture in and prevents the hives from “breathing”.  Dripping condensation and moisture will kill the bees, especially during freezing temperatures.  So good ventilation is imperative.

We decided against wrapping and opted for barriers that would envelop three sides, leaving the fronts of the hives open so the girls can come and go as the temperatures fluctuate.  The hubster came up with wooden frames that wrap around the outside of the hives, leaving air space between the frames and the hive boxes for circulation, while protecting the hives from wind.   The outside of the frames are lined with black roofing paper to retain heat from the sun.  The bottoms are anchored to the ground with large railroad nails, and the tops are open to allow easy access into the hives.  The bees don’t mind them one bit (always a plus), access is much easier than if they’d been wrapped, and we can reuse the frames year after year.

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I confess that having only a few hives does afford the luxury of experimenting with more elaborate solutions like this.  And it helps to have a woodworker in the house.

As for the inside, they’re ok for now, but after more research, I believe I have a simple and effective solution figured out.  So stay tuned for ideas on how to configure the insides of your hives for winter.