Tag Archive | candy

Do Bees Hibernate?

January 31, 2016 (Sunday)

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Temperatures got up to a whopping 54 degrees today!  After weeks of freezing temperatures and a 3ft snowfall, I finally had the chance to check on my girls and restock their candy supply. 54 degrees is still somewhat cold for the bees.  I certainly wouldn’t start pulling out frames and breaking apart boxes until the temps are at least in the 60’s.  Below 50 degrees, the bees begin to cluster.  Bees need to cluster in the cold because that’s how they generate heat and stay warm.

What Bees Do During the Wintertime

People often ask me if the bees are hibernating.  Well, bees don’t really hibernate.  Yes, they collect food to prepare for the winter, and yes, they stay in their hives during temperatures below 50 degrees.  Once the temps drop into the 40s or lower, the bees cluster around the queen and they use their wings to generate heat.  The larger the cluster, the more heat they can generate and the better chance they have of surviving the winter, as long as there’s enough food in the hive to keep them from starving.  Bees don’t sleep.  They work around the clock…each one has a role and a purpose.

Opening the hives in temperatures below 50 degrees risks breaking the cluster.  Best not to disturb the bees in the cold.  When the cluster is broken, or when bees get separated from the cluster in the cold, they can freeze.  So my rule of thumb is, if I see the bees out and about, then it’s ok for me to open the tops of the hives and add candy.

Checking on the Girls

I schlepped up to the hives to find them flying in full force, and judging by the blanket of bees atop the blanket of snow, they’ve been super busy cleaning house.  This is a good thing.  They clean all the dead bees and debris out of the hives whenever possible.  This helps prevent disease and keeps the colony healthy.  They’ve also been busy taking orientation flights (another term for much needed potty break), and bringing in pollen.  Yep, the little buggers found pollen in this desolate white land.  Gotta love their spunk!  It was a happy sight, indeed.

RIP Green Hive

I’d been anticipating the demise of Green Hive since the last time I’d checked on them.  Lots of bees were flying in and around the hive.  I also noticed some bees fighting at the bottom entrance (shown below).  A sign that Green Hive was being robbed by the other bees.

I opened the top and sure enough, the other bees were robbing the remaining candy and honey, and Green Hive’s cluster stared up from between the frames in a dead, frozen state (shown below).  Not one of my prouder moments as a beekeeper since I decided to take them into winter with two boxes rather than combining them with a stronger hive.  Another lesson learned…

Freezing temperatures are best for preserving dead hives since parasites won’t infest the hives as long as the temperatures are freezing.  Once things start to warm up in March, I’ll clean it up and get it ready to take in a new split colony in the spring, along with Blue Hive.

Recycled Swarm Trap

As I walked around the garden I noticed that the swarm trap that had been left up since last spring, has been claimed by some other form of wildlife.  I suspect squirrels.  They chewed large holes in both sides, and another hole that appears to be stuffed with garbage – plastic, paper, and who knows what else (shown below).  Well, if it couldn’t house a swarm, then I’m glad something else found a good use for it.  We’ll build another one in a few months and hope that it catches more swarms than this one did.

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After this weekend, we’re all back in cabin fever mode.  Hope it won’t be too long again before we get another reprieve.  Stay warm everyone and let’s hope Mr. Groundhog doesn’t see his shadow.  Early spring would bee nice :o)

 

 

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Ready for Spring

January 25, 2016 (Monday)

Hives in snow

It’s been an uneventful winter up til now.  Mother nature just hit us with a good 3 feet of snow this past weekend.  I know that’s not a big deal for some of you northern folks, but for us Marylanders, that’s a butt load of snow!

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How are the bees?  To bee honest, I won’t really know until the temperatures rise so I open the hives and add candy.  I’m hoping they have enough bees to stay warm and enough food to keep them going.  As I cleared snow off the hives, I did notice some dead bees in front of the entrances.   One or two flew out to see what was going on.  That’s always a good sign.

January is the time for clustering and keeping warm.  February and March is the time when they begin to produce more bees in preparation for spring, so keeping them fed and well ventilated during that time will be key to a strong start come spring.  Pollen patties are also on my to-do list.

As we were snowed in, I made a nice 10 lb batch of candy for the girls.  And we can’t forget the birds either, so I melted some tallow that had been rendered for soaps and mixed in some bird seed to make suet cakes.  Next week we cold crash and bottle a 10 gallon batch of blueberry mead, which will go on to age indefinitely.  We’re staying busy with indoor activities, but definitely looking forward to spring.   Hope everyone’s bees are doing well.  Stay safe and warm.

Candy and suet

 

Playing Catch Up

December 24, 2015

Happy Holidays to everyone!  I’m woefully behind on bee updates, and now that all the holiday hustle and bustle is slowing down, it’s a good time for a quick recap of the past few months…

Picking up Where We Left Off…

Not sure if you recall the Price of Slacking post from mid-September.  Laying patterns were sporadic or brood was dwindling in three hives.  For the record, this is not uncommon when the seasons change and the bees begin to transition their focus from multiplying their numbers to storing food for the winter.  Regardless, I made the mistake of getting involved by ordering 3 mite resistant queens from PA ($150 w/ shipping, yikes!).  High price due to 1) scarcity of queens that time of year, and 2) they were good quality, mite resistant queens from a very reputable breeder.  And they came from PA, so I knew they could withstand our winter.

 

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New Queens in the Hives

For the first time, I entered the hives with the intent of pinching queens.  Of course, when I reentered hives to replace the queens, the brood patterns had improved in all three hives. Ugh!  Too late, I had the queens in hand, so I found and pinched 2 nice looking queens in Purple and Blue hives and added the new queens.  I felt sick over it and decided I will not do that again.  However, I was patting myself on the back upon realizing that I am indeed capable of successfully identifying unmarked queens.

Green hive had dwindled in numbers, so I reduced their boxes down to two and could not find their queen.  I ended up leaving them with their existing queen…which left me with one homeless queen.  I gave her to a fellow bee club member and tried to brush this fiasco out of mind.

RIP Blue Hive

Blue Hive did not take.  They died out within a week or two.  The queen in Purple Hive did take.  We entered winter with 4 hives.  Who knows if they would still be going had I not gotten involved.  I know I’d be $150 richer!

 

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Ever Forward…into Winter

I winterized the girls in October, adding the wind barriers and mouse guards.  I made candy, which was added to the hives a week ago.  Believe it or not, we’ve had 70 degree weather in December here in MD.  Not sure if that’s good or bad, but the bees seem to enjoy it when the sun shines.  It’s been wet, so ventilation and ice are at the top of my concerns this winter.

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All four hives are still going.  Green hive is small and fragile, so I don’t have high hopes for them.  Yellow hive is not as strong as they had been over the summer.  Mint and Purple hives are currently my two strongest.  As I’ve said many times, anything can happen at any time.  Just keep them fed and well ventilated, and hope for the best.

In the meantime, we’re making good use of the honey.  The hubster has already made a braggot (honey beer), and I have 10 gallons of mead aging in the hall closet. We’ve been eating it and cooking with it.  I made cream honey for Christmas gifts, and I’ve been making lots of lotions and potions to sell for my Bead and Bubble business.  We’ll have an online store up soon.

Three Years of BooBee Honey!

All in all, we’re truly blessed with our bees and blessed to have so many friends and family who are interested in learning and reading about them.  I’ve been writing this blog for three years.  Hard to believe.  I’ve referred back to it many times myself, and I’m thrilled everytime another beekeeper tells me they love my blog and have learned from it.  That’s what it’s all about.

Thank you all for sharing our beekeeping adventure.  The journey is far from over!

Merry Christmas (and/or happy holidays) and best wishes for a thriving 2016 beekeeping year!

Paula, the Hubster, and the Bees

BooBee December Update

December 13, 2014, Saturday

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Between work and the holidays, my free time has disappeared, and so I’m playing catchup on my bee journal.

The weather changes every few days around here – 60’s and sunny one day, then below 30’s and bitter cold.  I don’t mind that because the girls get opportunities to get out and about and I can check on their statuses.  I confess that during the winter I never quite know what’s going on, and I’m never an optimist.  Anything can happen at any time.

Possible Issues with Purple Hive

Everyone is still flying about during warm spurts, but I have noticed that Purple Hive has a lot more dead bees coming out of the hive than the others, and Mint Hive doesn’t appear to have much activity at all.  When I lift the lids, I see bees in all hives but Purple Hive.  That doesn’t necessarily mean they’re dying out because they may be toward the bottom staying warm.  Candy has been consumed and they are cleaning house regularly, so there is activity.  I just have to sit back and hope for the best until the weather turns warm enough to warrant further investigation.

Winter Prep

I hadn’t shown off our winter wind breakers this year.  Last year’s wind breakers were very effective, but a bit tedious to put up and maintain.  This year we went with a simpler approach.  My husband owns a large format printing business, which means he has access to coroplast and metal frames that stick in the ground.  He used thick 1/2 inch 4 ft x 6 ft sheets of coroplast to form a barrier around the outside of the hives.  This creates an easy, inexpensive and effective wind breaker.

I don’t wrap hives, mainly because I believe that hives need to breath and that wrapping prevents that, causing ventilation issues.  If we lived in Canada or Vermont, then yes, I would probably wrap.  But with our warmer climate, although we have cold spurts and snow, I don’t think it warrants wrapping.  Wind breakers help tremendously for keeping out the cold and they’re much easier to work around.

Bees can manage in the cold – moisture is a bigger problem.

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Candy Making Party

I mentioned that they’re eating candy.  In November our bee club had our annual Candy Making Party.  I love the candy making party.  Always a fun time to get better acquainted with other beekeepers, ask questions and learn.  Click here to check out our candy recipe.   The bees seem to enjoy the candy and since the party, I’ve already replenished their supply.  Some feel that candy is for emergency feeding.  True, but I don’t think it hurts to keep it in the hives during the winter to ensure they always have food.  If they don’t need it, they won’t eat it, it’s a simple as that.  I supplemented with candy all winter last year and had two very healthy hives come through with flying colors.

One lesson I learned is NOT to cover the top of the frames with candy because this inhibits ventilation.  This year I placed the candy across the front third of the hive on the side where the morning sun first hits.   This helps soften the candy and allows plenty of room for air to circulate.

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So there you have a two month update in a nutshell.  Bees, winterization and candy…oh my!  Hope everyone’s girls are hanging in there through this cold and blustery time of year.  Expect the worst and hope for the best…that’s my motto!

I am looking forward to the quiet time to catch up on indoor activities like reading up on my strategies for the coming year, cleaning equipment, and making homemade lotions and potions.  Stay tuned for fun recipes and how to’s.

Best wishes from all of the BooBees at BooBee Honey for a bee-utiful, happy holiday season!!!  

Bees Get a Warm Day for Christmas

Saturday, December 21, 2013

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Hives after a recent snowfall.

My Christmas present came a few days early this year.  A sunny 60 degree day revealed 3 active hives.  I couldn’t be more excited and more grateful after a month and a half of cold and snow and wet, which for a beekeeper equates to waiting and not knowing.

Yesterday morning, Green Hive 1 and Yellow Hive 2 were busy with bees flying in and out, taking their much needed cleansing flights.  Yes, bees have to relieve themselves too or disentery could set in – one of many potential problems faced by the bees during the winter, along with excessive moisture, mites and pests, starvation and disease.  The bees can actually take quite a bit of cold, so freezing is not usually a problem.  Heck, bees are commonly kept all the way up through Canada.  If they can take those temps, then 30 degrees is nothing.

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A few weeks later, 60 degrees and sunny and the bees are alive and well!

Later that afternoon, Blue Hive 3 had joined the activity.   Everyone was out and about, cleaning house and enjoying the sunshine.  I opened the tops to add more food. Who knows when I’ll get a chance to peek in again.  The girls were buzzing around me a little, but they were surprisingly docile, and many were up top enjoying the candy.  I piled up their food stores and put them away til our next 60 degree day.

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Adding food to help them through the coming months. This photos actually shows what not to do. Only cover 1/4-1/3 of the frames on the side that first receives the morning sun. Too much coverage impedes air flow and can cause moisture to be retained in the hive.

We still have a long way to go.  January and February could be brutal, and their numbers have dwindled – typical for winter when they’re focusing on staying warm rather than reproducing.  Remember, the life of a worker bee is only about 21 days.  The closer we get to spring, the more the bees will begin eating like crazy.  This is often when the starvation sets in.  The trick is to always stay 5 steps ahead.  Now I know they’ll survive our cold, that their stores are good.  I didn’t realize how much I had missed them.  A wonderful gift indeed – a day of validation that my bees are still alive and that I must be doing something right.  Now I sit back and wait some more, and continue to hope.

Best wishes to everyone!  May your holidays bee merry and bright!  And may you and your bees bee healthy and happy in 2014!

Bee Candy Making Party

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Our Frederick Beekeeping Association had their annual candy making party this past weekend.  What a fun gorgeous day!  Another first for me, so I was happy to learn from the experts.  The girls should be thrilled.  I couldn’t believe how much candy I brought home from a single batch.   I gave each hive a sample and packed the rest up in the freezer.  Recipe is below…

Bee Candy Recipe

This candy board recipe is provided by VP Queen Bees.

This type of supplemental feeding is extremely effective when colonies can break cluster and get up to the candy board to feed. Commonly used for build-up, this feeding method could also be used to supplement heavy fall feeding with 2:1 syrup.

The stirring and cooling are essential for the candy to form. If the mix does not “candy” and is clear, one may re-heat it and try again.

WARNING: DO NOT LET THE MIX CARAMELIZE BY OVERHEATING. Caramelized mix can be deadly to feeding bees.

  • 20 pounds granulated sugar
  • 1 pound powdered sugar
  • 46 oz Water
  • *** 2  oz MegaBee pollen substitute (dissolved in ~4 oz water) (we have also used 4 oz with no problem)
  • 2 oz honey (preferably yours)  :-)
  • 3/4 oz lemon juice
  • Pinch of aromatic spice mixture (cinnamon, allspice, etc)
  1. Heat water to about 200F.
  2. Add granulated sugar; stir to mix
  3. Heat to 210F
  4. Cool in cold water bath
  5. Add powdered sugar
  6. Add honey, lemon juice and incorporate
  7. *** Add pollen substitute slurry and incorporate
  8. When mix has cooled to 200, begin stirring
  9. Put into cold water bath and continue stirring
  10. As soon as mix “clouds up” and thickens, pour.

(Can be poured into inverted inner-covers but may be poured into shallow baking sheets lined with wax or newspaper. When hardened but still warm, lightly score to make suitable sized rectangles–these may be placed directly over the cluster).

  1. *** Optional Adding in pollen substitute is more appropriate for when one wants their colonies to build-up i.e. in the early Spring.
  2. Honey source should be known and disease free.