Our First Swarm – The Final Chapter

May 30, 2014 (Friday)

 

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After 2 days, I knew the girls had left for good. Sad but true. I always hear about beekeepers capturing lots and lots of swarms. I never hear about the swarms that leave for good.  I wonder if that happens more or less than the stories with happy endings?

I consulted my beekeeping club to find out how I can avoid another disappointing loss down the road. The consensus was that some swarms just go too high, to places you can’t possibly get to. That’s what my girls did, and it seems like most beekeepers just accept the loss and move on.  It’s another standard part of beekeeping.

But what if we hadn’t been home? How would I have known they swarmed?  The answer to that question is simply the reduction in bee traffic, which I confess is quite noticeable. Before, the bees were piling up at the entrance, trying to get in and out.  Now they seem less congested, more comfortable and efficient.  Like the wheel has been oiled and is turning much smoother now.

But what can be done to keep them from flying off?  Why didn’t they opt for the bait traps?  Did they find another home?

I’m sure the little traitors found another home somewhere…probably in another beekeeper’s hive.  As for keeping them around next time and whether or not bait hives work, here’s an interesting theory that makes sense.

Bees know well ahead of time that they are going to swarm.  That’s no secret.  But consider this -scout bees are actually forager bees. During their flights out looking for pollen and nectar sources, they are simultaneously scoping out the local scene to determine a good potential home for their pending swarm. So the bees already have a good idea of where they will relocate before the swarm even occurs. If this is true, then a bait hive is virtually useless after the swarm has already occurred.  However, if the bait hive is positioned nearby (at least 8 feet high) several days or weeks before the swarm occurs, then there’s a chance it might work.

There’s also a chance that you might catch your neighbor’s swarming bees. That’s ok too. All is fair in love and beekeeping…as long as you don’t tell your neighbor.

I’d certainly be interested to hear some swarm stories. How have swarms been captured from impossible places, like 40 ft tree branches? How often are swarms missed? Any success using bait hives?  There are probably as many scenarios as there are beekeepers, and there’s no better way to learn.  So let’s hear it!

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